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Hickory UWCD No. 1

Management Plan: 2009-2019

TABLE OF CONTENTS

DISTRICT MISSION

TIME PERIOD

HISTORY

REGIONAL COOPERATION AND COORDINATION

LOCATION AND EXTENT

ECONOMIC ENTERPRISE IN THE HICKORY DISTRICT

STATEMENT OF GUIDING PRINCIPLES

TOPOGRAPHY

GROUNDWATER RESOURCES OF THE HICKORY DISTRICT

HICKORY AQUIFER

EDWARDS-TRINITY AQUIFER

ELLENBURGER-SAN SABA AQUIFER

MARBLE FALLS AQUIFER

MANAGED AVAILABLE GROUNDWATER IN THE DISTRICT

METHODOLOGY FOR CALCULATING DISTRICT WATER SUPPLY AND DEMAND

GROUNDWATER AVAILABILITY IN THE HICKORY DISTRICT

SUMMARY OF HISTORICAL GROUNDWATER USE IN THE DISTRICT

ESTIMATE OF RECHARGE FROM PRECIPITATION TO SURFACE WATER BODIES,

 AND FLOWS INTO, OUT OF, AND BETWEEN THE EDWARDS AND TRINITY GROUPS

COMPARISON OF ESTIMATED ANNUAL RECHARGE TO THE EDWARDS-TRINITY

 AQUIFER FROM PRECIPITATION

DISTRICT WATER DEMAND PROJECTIONS BY COUNTY

SURFACE WATER RESOURCES OF THE HICKORY UWCD

PROJECTED SURFACE WATER SUPPLIES

TOTAL PROJECTED WATER SUPPLIES OF THE DISTRICT

ACTIONS, PROCEDURES, PERFORMANCE AND AVOIDANCE FOR PLAN

 IMPLEMENTATION

TRACKING METHODOLOGY

MANAGEMENT GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS

GOALS

1.0 PROVIDE FOR EFFICIENT USE

2.0 CONTROL AND PREVENT WASTE

3.0 ADDRESSING NATURAL RESOURCE ISSUES

4.0 ADDRESSING CONJUNCTIVE SURFACE WATER ISSUES

 5.0 ADDRESSING DROUGHT CONDITIONS

 6.0 ADDRESSING CONSERVATION

MANAGEMENT GOALS NOT APPLICABLE TO THE DISTRICT

STATEMENT OF COMMITMENT BY THE DISTRICT

Bibliography/Sources

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

District Mission

The Hickory Underground Water Conservation District No. 1 strives to conserve, preserve, prevent waste, protect, and recharge the underground waters of all aquifers within the legal boundaries, as far as practicable to minimize the draw-down of the water table and the reduction of artesian pressure within the District Boundaries.

Time Period

This amended plan becomes effective upon approval by the Board of Directors and remains in effect until an amended plan is approved or December 1, 2013, whichever is later. The plan may be revised at anytime, or after five years when the plan will be reviewed, revised or amended and is approved as administratively complete by the Texas Water Development Board.

History

At the request of area citizens, the Texas Water Development Board entered an order on December 29, 1975, delineating a subdivision of the Hickory Aquifer Underground Water Reservoir in Concho, Kimble, Llano, Mason, McCulloch, Menard and San Saba Counties. In November 1981, a petition was submitted to the Texas Water Commission calling for the creation of the Hickory Underground Water Conservation District No. 1 (District). At a hearing on June 9, 1982, before the Texas Water Commission the petition was granted and the District thus created.

The confirmation election required by state statute was held on August 14, 1982; the District was officially established with a 94% approval of voters in those areas   of Concho, Kimble, Mason, McCulloch, Menard and San Saba within the District boundaries.

On August 12, 1999 the petition of creation was amended by the TNRCC (now Texas Commission on Environmental Quality) to include all aquifers within the legal boundaries and management jurisdiction of the District.


On January 11, 2003, landowners of Mason County petitioned the District to annex the remainder of Mason County not currently in the District, and on May 03, 2003, in a special election held at the Mason County Courthouse the remainder of Mason County was annexed into the District with approval of 88% of the voters.

Regional Cooperation and Coordination

Regional Water Planning Groups

In 1998 the District was apportioned into two Regional Water Planning Groups established pursuant to § 16.053 of the Texas Water Code  Concho, Kimble, Mason, McCulloch and Menard are located in Region F and  San Saba County is in the Lower Colorado Regional Water Planning Group (Region K). The District’s Regional planning responsibilities are within a 46-county area, stretching from Matagorda Bay to the Pecos River in West Texas.

Groundwater Management Area 7

In 2003 the Texas Water Development Board designated the boundaries of 16 groundwater management areas in Texas. The District lies entirely within Groundwater Management Area 7, which encompasses 34 counties and 21 groundwater conservation districts within an area of approximately 42,000 square miles. The groundwater management area was designated for the Edwards-Trinity aquifer, but also includes all or portions of the minor Lipan-Kickapoo, Hickory, Ellenburger-San Saba, and Dockum aquifers, as well as a small portion of the Ogallala aquifer,

The District participates in the mandatory joint planning process mandated by 36.108 of the Texas Water Code and is actively working with the other 20 GMA- 7districts to develop Desired Future Conditions for the Edwards-Trinity aquifer. The   District is also meeting with relevant GMA 7 districts and conferring regularly with the Texas Water Development Board to establish Desired Future Conditions and assist in the calculation of Managed Available Groundwater for the Hickory and Ellenburger-San Saba aquifer formations, for which Groundwater Availability Models are not available, nor are any scheduled for completion before the end of 2010 when initial DFCs must be submitted to the Board

West Texas Regional Groundwater Alliance

The District is a member of the West Texas Regional Groundwater Alliance. The regional alliance consists of seventeen (17) locally created and locally funded districts that encompass almost 8.75 million acres or 13,000 square miles of West Texas. This West Texas region is as diverse as the State of Texas, making it necessary for each member district to develop its own unique priority management goals and rules to best serve the needs of its constituents.
In  1988, four (4) groundwater districts; Coke County UWCD, Glasscock GCD, Irion County WCD, and Sterling County UWCD signed the original Cooperative Agreement. Since then the number of groundwater conservation districts in the area has more than quadrupled. The current member districts are:

Coke County UWCD

Crockett County GCD

Glasscock GCD

Hickory UWCD

Irion County WCD

Lipan-Kickapoo WCD

Plateau UWC & SD

Santa Rita UWCD

Sterling County UWCD

Sutton County UWCD

Menard County UWD

Lone Wolf GCD

Hill Country UWCD

Jeff Davis County UWCD

Middle Pecos GCD

Permian Basin UWCD

Wes-Tex GCD

 

The Alliance was created to implement common objectives of coordinating and facilitating the conservation, preservation, and beneficial use of water and related sources. Local districts monitor the water-related activities of the farming and ranching, oil and gas, industrial entities and municipalities

District Location and Extent

The Hickory Underground Water Conservation District No. 1 is located near the geographical center of Texas and is comprised of approximately 1,683,080 acres, including portions of: McCulloch, Menard, Kimble, San Saba, Concho counties and the entirety of Mason County. In 2003 the District gained approximately 433,000 acres with the annexation of the remainder of Mason County that had not been included when the District was initially created.

Principal industries of the District are listed in the table below. The District's economy is based to a large degree on agriculture; 12% of the acreage in the District is cropland. Principal municipalities in or near the district boundaries are Brady, San Saba, Mason and Eden.

Economic Enterprise in the Hickory District1

County

       Economy

Concho

Livestock production, tourism, hunting, fishing

Kimble

Livestock production, tourism, hunting, fishing

McCulloch

Agribusiness, tourism, manufacturing, silica sand

Mason

Ranching, hunting, tourism

Menard

Agribusiness, hunting and tourism, minor oil and gas production

San Saba

Gov/Services, retail pecan industry, tourism, hunting

 

Statement of Guiding Principles

The Hickory Underground Water Conservation District No. 1 (District) is created and organized under the terms and provisions of Article XVI, Section 59, of the Constitution of Texas and Chapter 36 (formerly Chapter 52) of the Texas Water Code, Vernon's Texas Civil Statutes, and the District’s actions are authorized by, and consistent with this constitutional and statutory provision, including all amendments and additions. The District is created for the purpose of conserving, preserving, recharging, controlling subsidence, protecting and preventing waste and as far as practicable to minimize the drawdown of the water table and the reduction of artesian pressure of all Aquifers within the district boundaries. In order to carry out its constitutional and statutory purposes, the District has all the powers authorized by Article XVI, Section 59, of the Texas Constitution, and Chapter 36 of the Texas Water Code, Vernon's Texas Civil Statutes, together with all amendments and additions.

The District's purposes and powers are implemented through promulgation and enforcement of the District's regulations. These regulations are adopted and revised under the authority of Subchapter E, Chapter 36, Texas Water Code, and are incorporated herein as a part of the District's management plan.
 

Topography

The District is within the Colorado River basin and is bisected by the Llano and San Saba Rivers, as well as numerous other creeks. Drainage is typically from west to east.
There are two major geologic features within the District. The Llano Uplift (Central Basin) is in the eastern and southern portions of the District. This feature is made up of ancient Cambrian rocks ranging in age from 1.0 to 1.2 billion years old and comprises granite and older metamorphic rocks. The northern and western parts of the District are in the Edwards Plateau region and are made up of Cretaceous Age limestone, dolomite, and marble.
The District elevation ranges from 1,100 to 2,300 feet above sea level.

Groundwater Resources of the Hickory Aquifer2

The Hickory Aquifer is the primary source of the District’s groundwater, which is used for irrigation, public water supply, industrial, stock, and the domestic needs of the people and entities served.

The Hickory Aquifer occurs in parts of the counties in the Llano uplift region of Central Texas. Discontinuous outcrops of the Hickory Sandstone overlie or flank exposed Precambrian rocks that form the central core of the uplift. The down dip artesian portion of the aquifer encircles the uplift and extends to maximum depths approaching 4000 ft. Most of the water pumped from the aquifer is used for irrigation. The largest capacity wells, however, have been completed for municipal water supply and industrial purposes in the Mason, Eden and Brady area.

The Hickory Sandstone Member of the Cambrian Riley Formation is composed of some of the oldest sedimentary rocks found in Texas. In most of the northern and western portions of the aquifer, the Hickory can be differentiated into lower, middle, and upper units, which reach a maximum thickness of 480 feet in southwestern McCulloch County. In the southern and eastern extent of the aquifer, the Hickory consists of only two units. Extensive block faulting has compartmentalized the Hickory Aquifer, thus restricting hydrologic connection from one area to another.

Edwards-Trinity Aquifer3

The Edwards-Trinity Plateau Aquifer underlies the Edwards Plateau east of the Pecos River and the Stockton Plateau west of the Pecos River, supplying water to all or parts of 38 counties.

The aquifer consists of saturated sediments of lower Cretaceous age Trinity Group formations. Natural chemical quality of water ranges from fresh to slightly saline. The water is typically hard and may vary widely in concentrations of dissolved solids and bicarbonate. The salinity of the groundwater tends to increase toward the west.

Well yields are typically low in the eastern portion of the Edwards-Trinity, consequently there is little pumpage from the aquifer within the District. Nevertheless, in some instances water levels have declined as a result of pumpage. Historical declines have occurred in the northwestern part of the District. Rapid population migration from the cities of Austin and San Antonio will add considerably to usage. 

Ellenburger-San Saba Aquifer4

The Ellenburger-San Saba Aquifer underlies 4,000 square miles in parts of 15 counties in the Llano Uplift area of Central Texas. Discontinuous outcrops of the aquifer generally encircle older rocks in the core of the Uplift. The remaining down-dip portion contains fresh to slightly saline water to depths of approximately 3,000 feet below land and surface.
Water produced from the aquifer has a range in dissolved solids between 200 and 3,000 mg/l, but usually less than 1,000 mg/l. The quality of water deteriorates rapidly away from the outcrop areas. Approximately, 20 miles of more down-dip from the outcrop, water is typically unsuitable for most uses.
Most of the deep municipal wells, which supply the City of Brady, produce an unknown amount of water from the Ellenburger-San Saba sequence of rocks. A large portion of the water supply for the City of San Saba is believed to be from the Ellenberger-San Saba and Marble Falls Aquifer
.


Marble Falls Aquifer5

The Marble Falls Aquifer occurs primarily in the portions of McCulloch and San Saba counties within the District. Smaller amounts of water are also used for rural domestic supplies, watering of livestock and irrigation. Only small portions of Mason and Kimble counties are affected by this aquifer.
The Marble Falls Aquifer occurs in several outcrops, primarily along the northern and eastern flanks of the Llano Uplift Region of Central Texas. Groundwater occurs in fractures, solution cavities, and channels in the limestone of the Marble Falls Formation of the Pennsylvanian Bend Group. Maximum thickness of the formation is 600 feet. Numerous large springs issue from the aquifer and provide a significant part of the base-flow to the San Saba River in McCulloch and San Saba counties and to the Colorado River in San Saba and Lampasas counties.

Existing data for the Marble Falls aquifer show that it contains mostly fresh water in outcrop areas and becomes mineralized a short distance down-dip from the outcrop areas. However, very few data exist to evaluate the brackish water that is present.

Most wells producing from the Marble Falls aquifer produce fresh groundwater on the outcrop, while groundwater becomes highly mineralized within a relatively short distance of the down-dip. However, because the areal extent of the Marble Falls aquifer is relatively limited, and because much of the existing data indicate that the aquifer has limited groundwater availability, the Marble Falls aquifer must be considered a very limited source of brackish groundwater. Due to the presumed deep nature where brackish groundwater would be located, and the low productivity of the aquifer, relative costs are expected to be moderate to high.

Managed Available Groundwater in District Aquifers

The District is actively participating in joint planning with 20 other groundwater districts in GMA 7 pursuant to Section 36.108 of the Texas Water Code, but Desired Future Conditions for District aquifers within the management area have not yet been adopted and are not due to the Texas Water Development Board until 2010. Once the desired future conditions have been adopted by GMA 7, an estimate of the managed available groundwater can be determined. The District may amend the management plan at that time.

Methodology for Calculating District Water Supply and Demand

Irrigation and Livestock: Irrigation and livestock numbers for counties are allocated to the District in proportion to the percentage of the area of the respective counties within the District as follows: Concho, 11.43%; Kimble, 2.55%; Mason, 100%; McCulloch 73.03%; Menard, 13.45%; San Saba, 55.71%.

Mining, Electric Generation and Manufacturing: No mining, electric generation or manufacturing takes place within the District in Concho, Kimble and Menard Counties. All mining in Mason, McCulloch and San Saba counties takes place within District boundaries. Electric generation estimates for Mason, McCulloch and San Saba Counties are included within District boundaries, but all estimates are zero. All manufacturing in Mason, McCulloch and San Saba counties takes place within the District.

 

Municipal and County Other: The municipalities of Brady (McCulloch County), Eden (Concho County), Mason (Mason County), and San Saba (San Saba County), and the Millersview-Doole WSC (Concho and McCulloch Counties) and Richland SUD (San Saba and McCulloch Counties) are within District boundaries and are included in the respective data tables. The municipalities of Junction (Kimble County) and Menard (Menard County) are outside of District boundaries and are excluded from the data tables. The county data for the County Other Water user Group is apportioned in all counties based upon the percentage of county area located within the District. See the Irrigation and Livestock methodology discussion for the respective percentage values.

 

District totals within tables may vary by an acre-foot due to rounding of numbers.

TABLE 1.

GROUNDWATER AVAILABILITY (SUPPLY) IN THE HICKORY DISTRICT                                                                                   (Extrapolated from 2007 State Water Plan, 3/30/2007)

County

Aquifer

2000

2010-2060

(annual supply)

Concho

Edwards-Trinity

916

1404

 

Hickory

1634

1634

 

Lipan

744

  744

 

Other Aquifer

64

    56

Kimble

Edwards-Trinity

682

  611

 

Ellenberger-San Saba

             6             

                             6                               

Mason

Edwards-Trinity

2982

3828

 

Ellenberger-San Saba

       4650

                                 4650

 

Hickory

76492

76492

McCulloch

Edwards-Trinity

3630

6024

 

Ellenberger-San Saba

         12066

                       12066

 

Hickory

92124

92124

 

Other

188

76

Menard

Edwards-Trinity

2573

2066

 

Ellenberger-San Saba

 

                                            21

 

Hickory

 

4573

 

Other

31

6

San Saba

Ellenberger-San Saba

       5679     

                          3164

 

Hickory

3643

2030

 

Marble Falls

6897

3842

District Total (acre-feet)

  215,001

                                     215,417

Of the total  215, 417 acre-feet of annual groundwater supply of the District for the period 2010-2060, 43,780 acre-feet is annual recharge to District aquifers, the remaining 171,637 acre-feet is from aquifer storage.6

 

 

TABLE 2.

Summary of Historical Groundwater Use Within the District

(See the Methodology section for data apportionment criteria.)

(Source: Historical Groundwater Pumpage, Texas Water Development Board Water Use Survey database website, 5-14-08

(Acre-feet)

 

CONCHO COUNTY

(11.43% of land area is within the District)

 

Year

Municipal

Manufacturing

Electric

Irrigation

Mining

Livestock

Total

1999

682

0

0

538

0

58

 1278

2000

582

0

0

275

0

49

907 

2001

614

0

0

225

0

49

888

2002

613

0

0

397

0

50

 1059

2003

586

0

0

171

0

32

   789

 

KIMBLE COUNTY

(2.55% of land area is within the District)

 

Year

Municipal

Manufacturing

Electric

Irrigation

Mining

Livestock

Total

1999

0

0

0

6.0

0

10.0

16.0

2000

0

0

0

1.2

0

9.6

10.8

2001

0

0

0

1.3

0

9.3

10.6

2002

0

0

0

1.3

0

8.4

9.7

2003

0

0

0

1.3

0

6.5

7.8

 

MASON COUNTY

(100% of land area is within District)

 

Year

Municipal

Manufacturing

Electric

Irrigation

Mining

Livestock

Total

1999

920

0

0

8,856

6

493

10,275

2000

890

0

0

10,223

140

350

11,603

2001

850

0

0

9,499

6

396

10,751

2002

1772

0

0

9,866

0

327

11,965

2003

744

0

0

9,276

0

801

10,821

 

MCCULLOCH COUNTY

(73.03% of land area is in District)

 

Year

Municipal

Manufacturing

Electric

Irrigation

Mining

Livestock

Total

1999

3040

0

0

1467

140

455

5102

2000

3049

637

0

2038

  23

546

6293

2001

1849

669

0

1489

140

396

4543

2002

1847

489

0

1518

140

480

4474

2003

1984

704

0

2531

140

366

5725

 

 

 

 

 

MENARD COUNTY

(13.45% of land area is in District)

 

Year

Municipal

Manufacturing

Electric

Irrigation*

Mining

Livestock

Total

1999

0

0

0

84

0

43

127

2000

0

0

0

50

0

46

96

2001

0

0

0

56

0

45

101

2002

0

0

0

56

0

40

96

2003

0

0

0

25

0

46

71

  * Most groundwater irrigation in Menard County takes place in the Hickory aquifer.

 

SAN SABA COUNTY

(55.71% of land area is in District)

 

Year

Municipal

Manufacturing

Electric

Irrigation

Mining

Livestock

Total

1999

1039

24

0

614

163

482

2322

2000

1161

24

0

256

163

531

2135

2001

1226

24

0

197

163

488

2098

2002

1077

24

0

205

163

489

1958

2003

1074

7

0

419

163

245

1908

 

                                                           

TABLE 3.

 

 Estimates of Recharge from Precipitation, Discharges to Surface Water Bodies, and Flows Into, Out of and Between Edwards and Trinity Groups

in the Edwards-Trinity Aquifer within District  Boundaries

(Source: GAM 08-34, TWDB, May 28, 2008)

(acre-feet/year. All numbers rounded to nearest acre-foot )

 

Management Plan

Requirement

Aquifer or Confining Unit

Results

Estimated annual amount of recharge from precipitation

Edwards Group

Undifferentiated Trinity Group

 4,450

 7,797

Estimated annual volume of

water that discharges from the aquifer to springs and any surface water body including lakes, streams and rivers

Edwards Group

 

Undifferentiated

Trinity Group

 3,705

 

11,425

Estimated annual volume of flow into the District within the Edwards -Trinity aquifer in the District

Edwards Group

Undifferentiated

Trinity Group

 1,508

 

 5,403

Estimated annual volume of flow out of the

District within the Edwards - Trinity aquifer in the District

Edwards Group

Undifferentiated

Trinity Group

 1,061

 

 2,755

Estimated net annual volume of flow between the Edwards and Trinity Groups in the District

Edwards Group into the Undifferentiated Trinity Group

 

 1,264

 

 

Estimates of Recharge from Precipitation, Discharges to Surface Water Bodies, and Flows Into, Out of and Between  Aquifers

 in the Hickory Aquifer

  

 

No GAM Available

 

 

Estimates of Recharge from Precipitation, Discharges to Surface Water Bodies, and Flows Into, Out of and Between  Aquifers

 in the Ellenburger- San Saba Aquifer

 

 

No GAM Available

 

 

            Table 4 below compares the recharge numbers from GAM 08-34, dated May 28, 2008, from the Texas Water Development Board, and those from GAM 07-32, received from the TWDB on December 12, 2007, pursuant to a request from districts in  GMA 7 participating in joint planning in accordance with Section 36.108 of the Texas Water Code,  for a determination, inter alia, of estimated recharge to the Edwards-Trinity aquifer from precipitation under drought-of-record conditions.

                                                        

 

 

TABLE 4.

 

COMPARISON OF ESTIMATED ANNUAL RECHARGE TO

EDWARDS-TRINITY AQUIFER

FROM PRECIPITATION

 

 

Recharge

GAM 08-34

Recharge – GAM 07-32

TWDB  12/11/07

Concho County

      

              674

Kimble County

         

              670

Mason County

      

           1,915

McCulloch County

      

           3,692

Menard County

      

           2,086

San Saba County

       

                  0

District Total (acre-feet)

     12,247

           9,037

 


TABLE 5.

 

DISTRICT WATER DEMAND PROJECTIONS BY COUNTY

2007 ADOPTED STATE WATER PLAN

(See the Methodology section for data apportionment criteria.)

 

County

Water Use

2000

2010

2020

2030

2040

2050

2060

CONCHO

IRRIGATION

294

491

489

487

485

483

482

CONCHO

LIVESTOCK

62

89

89

89

89

89

89

CONCHO

COUNTY OTHER

19

22

23

23

23

23

23

CONCHO

Millersview-Doole WSC

116

130

135

135

135

135

135

CONCHO

MUNICIPAL-Eden

413

569

589

589

589

589

589

CONCHO TOTAL

(acre-feet)

905

1,301

1,325

1,323

1,321

1,319

1,317

 

KIMBLE

IRRIGATION

16

25

24

23

22

21

21

KIMBLE

LIVESTOCK

12

17

17

17

17

17

17

KIMBLE

COUNTY OTHER

5

6

6

6

6

6

6

KIMBLE Total

(acre-feet)

33

48

47

46

45

44

43

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MASON

IRRIGATION

10,223

10,079

9,936

9,792

9,648

9,505

9,363

MASON

LIVESTOCK

534

1,036

1,036

1,036

1,036

1,036

1,036

MASON

MINING

6

6

6

6

6

6

6

MASON

COUNTY OTHER

174

195

198

200

201

201

202

MASON

MUNICIPAL - Mason

715

749

753

755

756

757

757

MASON Total

(acre-feet)

11,652

12,065

11,929

11,789

11,647

11,505

11,364

 

MCCULLOCH

IRRIGATION

2,088

2,062

2,037

2,011

1,985

1,959

1,934

MCCULLOCH

LIVESTOCK

659

750

750

750

750

750

750

MCCULLOCH

MANUFACTURING

680

844

929

1,004

1,075

1,137

1,233

MCCULLOCH

MINING

140

154

159

162

165

168

171

MCCULLOCH

MUNICIPAL-Brady

1,875

1,898

1,931

1,931

1,931

1,931

1,931

MCCULLOCH

Millersview-Doole WSC

255

256

261

261

261

261

261

MCCULLOCH

Richland SUD

116

116

118

118

118

118

118

MCCULLOCH

COUNTY OTHER

15

9

9

9

9

9

9

MCCULLOCH Total

(acre-feet)

5,828

6,089

6,194

6,246

6,294

6,333

6,407

 

MENARD

IRRIGATION

423

815

813

810

807

804

802

MENARD

LIVESTOCK

56

86

86

86

86

86

86

MENARD

COUNTY OTHER

14

14

15

15

15

15

15

MENARD Total

(acre-feet)

493

916

914

911

908

905

903

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SAN SABA

IRRIGATION

1,866

1,805

1,747

1,691

1,636

1,583

1,532

SAN SABA

LIVESTOCK

664

664

664

664

664

664

664

SAN SABA

MANUFACTURING

24

28

30

31

32

33

35

SAN SABA

MINING

163

163

163

163

163

163

163

SAN SABA

MUNICIPAL – San Saba

892

893

895

896

897

897

898

SAN SABA

Richland SUD

185

193

208

220

232

233

235

SAN SABA

COUNTY OTHER

122

130

143

154

164

165

167

SAN SABA Total

(acre-feet)

3,915

3,876

3,849

3,819

3,788

3,738

3,693

District Total

(acre-feet)

22,826

24,294

24,257

24,133

24,003

23,844

23,728

 

Surface Water Resources of the Hickory UWCD No. 1

The only surface water impoundment used for purposes other than livestock consumption is Brady Lake. The normal pool capacity is 30,000 acre-feet with a calculated annual firm yield of 2,2528 acre-feet. Currently the City of Brady is not utilizing this water; however the city will construct a 3mgd R.O. Treatment Plant to provide the City of Brady adequate water supplies to blend with the Hickory Aquifer wells in order to maintain a Radium 226/228 level below state and federal standards. Current Brady Lake pumpage is approximately 9 acre-feet annually for domestic purposes.

The San Saba and Llano Rivers bisect the District; however, only a small amount is used for other than livestock and domestic purposes.

TABLE 6.

District Surface Water Usage by County and Category in 2004:

Water Use Survey – Historical Water Use

 

County

Municipal

Manufacturing

Irrigation

Electric

Mining

Livestock

Total

Concho

    44

     0

    143

   0

   0

      10

   197

Kimble

      0

     0

      56

   0

   0

        2

    58

Mason

      0

     0

    115

   0

   0

    524

   639

McCulloch

     21

     0

    364

   0

   0

      91

   476

Menard

       0

     0

    414

   0

   0

     10

   424

San Saba

   133

     0

  2229

   0

   0

   124

 2486

Total (acre-feet)

   198

     0

  3321

   0

   0

   761

 4280

 

TABLE 7.

 

PROJECTED SURFACE WATER SUPPLIES                                                               

2007 ADOPTED STATE WATER PLAN

(See the Methodology section for data apportionment criteria.)

 

 

2000

2010

2020

2030

2040

2050

2060

Concho County

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Run of River Irrig.

75

26

26

26

26

26

26

Livestock

20

14

14

14

14

14

14

Run of River County Other

8

4

4

4

4

4

4

Millersview-Doole WSC

0

92

85

123

112

0

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kimble County

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Run of River County Other

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Run of River Irrig.

50

38

38

38

38

38

38

Livestock

2

2

2

2

2

2

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mason County

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Livestock

628

451

451

451

451

451

451

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Menard County

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Run of River County Other

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Run of River Irrig.

466

395

395

395

395

395

395

Livestock

15

12

12

12

12

12

12

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

McCulloch County

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Run of River Irrig.

402

93

           93

93

93

93

93

Livestock

150

120

120

120

120

120

120

Brady

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Manufacturing

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Millersview-Doole WSC

0

161

164

238

216

0

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

San Saba County

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Run of River Irrig.

4,902

4,902

4,902

4,902

4,902

4,902

4,902

Livestock

0

125

125

125

125

125

125

County Other

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

DISTRICT TOTAL (acre-feet)

6,719

6,435

6,431

6,543

6,510

6,182

6,182

 

* Apportioning surface water irrigation by land area in accordance with the methodology discussed on page 8 yields the values in this table; however, the Menard County WCID observes that no surface water irrigation takes place from the San Saba River in the portion of Menard County within Hickory District boundaries.

 

TABLE 8.**

 

TOTAL PROJECTED WATER SUPPLIES OF THE DISTRICT

 

 

2000

2010

2020

2030

2040

2050

2060

Surface Water

6,719

6,435

6,431

6,543

6,510

6,182

6,182

Groundwater

215,001

215,417

215,417

215,417

215,417

215,417

215,417

TOTAL (acre-feet)

221,720

221,852

221,848

221,960

221,927

221,599

221,599

 

** Compilation of Table 1 and Table 7.

Table 9.

PROJECTED WATER MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES

IN THE 2007 ADOPTED STATE WATER PLAN

(See the Methodology section for data apportionment criteria.)

            Groundwater resources of the Hickory Underground Water Conservation District No. 1 could potentially be developed to implement, or be impacted by, the following water management strategies which are included in the adopted 2007 State Water Plan.

CONCHO COUNTY

WUG

Water Mgmt Strategy

Source

2010

2020

2030

2040

2050

2060

Irrigation

Irrig. Conservation

Conservation

0

748

1,496

1,496

1,496

1,496

Eden

Advanced Treatment

Hickory aquifer

392

392

392

392

392

392

Eden

Bottled Water Program

Hickory Aquifer

1

1

1

1

1

1

Eden

Replacement well

Hickory Aquifer

322

322

322

322

322

322

Millersview-Doole WSC

Subordination

Colorado River MWD System

34

42

1

7

0

0

Millersview-Doole WSC

New/Renew Water Supply

Colorado River MWD System

0

0

0

0

118

118

Total

(acre-feet/year)

 

749

1,505

2,212

2,218

2,329

2,329

 

KIMBLE COUNTY

WUG

Water Mgmt Strategy

Source

2010

2020

2030

2040

2050

2060

County Other

Subordination

Llano River Run-of-River City of Junction

9

9

9

9

9

9

Irrigation

Irrig. Conservation

Conservation

0

74

147

147

147

147

Total

(acre-feet/year)

 

9

83

156

156

156

156

MASON COUNTY

WUG

Water Mgmt Strategy

Source

2010

2020

2030

2040

2050

2060

Irrigation

Irrig. Conservation

Conservation

0

746

1,491

1,491

1,491

1,491

Total

(acre-feet/year)

 

0

746

1,491

1,491

1,491

1,491

MCCULLOCH COUNTY

WUG

Water Mgmt Strategy

Source

2010

2020

2030

2040

2050

2060

Brady

Conservation

Conservation

77

192

214

222

230

239

Irrigation

Irrig. Conservation

Conservation

0

1,977

394

394

394

394

Brady

Subordination

Brady Lake

2,170

2,170

2,170

2,170

2,170

2,170

Richland SUD

Advanced Treatment

Hickory aquifer

113

113

113

113

113

113

County Other

Bottled Water Program

Hickory aquifer

0

0

0

0

0

0

Richland SUD

Bottled Water Program

Hickory aquifer

1

1

1

1

1

1

Richland SUD

Replacement Well

Hickory aquifer

113

113

113

113

113

113

Millersview-Doole WSC

Subordination

Colorado River MWD System

67

81

1

14

0

0

Millersview-Doole WSC

New/Renew Water Supply

Colorado River MWD System

0

0

0

0

228

228

Total

(acre-feet/year)

 

2,541

4,647

3,006

3,027

3,249

3,258

MENARD COUNTY

WUG

Water Mgmt Strategy

Source

2010

2020

2030

2040

2050

2060

County Other

Develop Hickory Supplies

Hickory Aquifer

20

21

20

20

19

19

Irrigation

Irrigation Conservation

Conservation

0

23

46

46

46

46

Total

(acre-feet/year)

 

20

44

66

66

65

65

                                                            SAN SABA COUNTY

WUG

Water Mgmt Strategy

Source

2010

2020

2030

2040

2050

2060

Richland SUD

Municipal Conservation

Conservation

13

22

19

15

14

15

County Other

LCRA Contract Renewals

Highland Lakes System

20

20

20

20

20

20

      Total

   (acre-feet/year)

 

33

42

39

35

34

35

 

Table 10.

PROJECTED WATER SUPPLY NEEDS

IN THE ADOPTED 2007 STATE WATER PLAN

(See the Methodology section for data apportionment criteria.)

Agricultural Water Supply Needs

   WUG

2010

2020

2030

2040

2050

2060

Irrigation

2,441

2,421

2,402

2,383

2,361

2,342

Livestock

0

0

0

0

0

0

Total agricultural water supply needs

2,441

2,421

2,402

2,383

2,361

2,342

The remaining total projected water supply needs for the six counties in which the District lies which could be impacted by or implemented with District groundwater supplies are as follows:

Non- Agricultural Water Supply Needs

WUG

COUNTY

2010

2020

2030

2040

2050

2060

Eden

Concho

0

0

0

0

0

0

Millersview Doole

Concho

0

0

0

0

42

42

County Other

Concho

0

0

0

0

0

0

County Other

Kimble

9

7

3

0

0

0

Mason

Mason

0

0

0

0

0

0

County Other

Mason

0

0

0

0

0

0

Mining

Mason

0

0

0

0

0

0

Brady

McCulloch

870

884

865

845

833

833

Millersview-Doole

McCulloch

0

0

0

0

80

80

Richland SUD

McCulloch

0

0

0

0

0

0

County Other

McCulloch

0

0

0

0

0

0

Manufacturing

McCulloch

0

0

0

0

0

0

Mining

McCulloch

0

0

0

0

0

0

County Other

Menard

20

21

19

17

16

16

San Saba

San Saba

0

0

0

0

0

0

Richland SUD

San Saba

0

0

0220

3232

3233

5235

County Other

San Saba

0233

0256

0277

0295

0297

0300

Manufacturing

San Saba

026

030

031

033

033

035

Mining

San Saba

0163

0163

0163

0163

0163

0163

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Non-Agricultural Water Supply Needs

 

8998,678

9128,964

8879,135

8659,299

9749,418

9769,595

Total Water Supply Needs

 

26,5973,340

26,7393,333

26,5913,289

26,5243,248

26,3953,335

26,3713,318

In the year 2060 the total projected groundwater demands of the District are estimated at 23,262728 acre-feet. While this number appears to be well within available supplies, Federal Drinking Water Standards relating to the levels of radionuclides in much of the Hickory water supply will significantly diminish the availability of groundwater for public water supply purposes. According to the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, public water supplies in Mason County do not exceed the Federal radionuclide standards. However, the cities of Brady and Eden, as well as other municipal systems, may be impacted by the Federal standards. Projected municipal demand in Brady and Eden is estimated at 1,931 acre-feet in 2060.

 The City of San Angelo well field is permitted for production of 12,000 acre-feet from the Hickory aquifer. The wellfield has not been developed, so permitted supplies are not yet being conveyed to and used by the City. However, levels of radionuclides exceeding Federal drinking water standards in the San Angelo well field will render the supply unusable without treatment or blending with water from other sources.

ACTIONS, PROCEDURES, PERFORMANCE AND AVOIDANCE

                             FOR PLAN IMPLEMENTATION

 

The District will implement the provisions of this plan and will utilize the provisions of this plan as a guidepost for determining the direction or priority for District operations and activities. Operations of the District, all agreements entered into by the District and any additional planning efforts in which the District may participate will be consistent with the provisions of this plan.

 

The District has adopted rules relating to the permitting of wells and the production of groundwater and continues to review and revise those rules in accordance with the best scientific evidence available and pursuant to changes in state laws and regulations. The rules adopted by the District shall be pursuant to TWC § 36 and the provisions of this plan. All rules will be adhered to and enforced. The promulgation and enforcement of the rules will be based on the best technical evidence available.

 

The District shall treat all citizens indiscriminately.  Citizens may apply to the District for discretion in enforcement of the rules on grounds of adverse economic effect or unique local conditions. In granting of discretion to any rule, the Board of Directors shall consider the potential for adverse effect on adjacent landowners. The exercise of said discretion by the District Board shall not be construed as limiting the power of the District Board.

 

The District will seek cooperation in the implementation of this plan and the management of groundwater supplies within the District. All activities of the District will be undertaken in cooperation and coordinated with the appropriate state, regional or local management entity.”

 

 

 

 

 

Tracking Methodology

The District manager will provide a report of staff activities to the Board of Directors at quarterly board meetings to insure management objectives and goals are being achieved.

MANAGEMENT GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND PERFORMANCE STANDARDS

Goal 1.0 To provide the most efficient use of groundwater

Management Objective
1.1 Annually the district will provide educational materials identifying conservation measures for the efficient use of water. Annually, two (2) District newsletter issues will be published that contain water conservation information. Handout packets with conservation literature will be provided at the annual McCulloch County Soil and Water Conservation 5th Grade Field Day or one other water-related function.

Performance Standard
1.1a Number of newsletters published annually containing water conservation information.
1.1b Number of annual events where conservation material was provided.

Management Objective
1.2 To monitor groundwater availability over the five-year management period; the District will identify and monitor 50 wells for annual water level monitoring and obtain quarterly water levels on the monitored wells.

Performance Standards
1.2  Number of monitor wells measured quarterly.


Goal 2.0 To control and prevent the waste of groundwater.

Management Objective                                                 

 2.1 Once each year the District will loan flow meters to assist at least one irrigating farmer within the District to evaluate irrigation systems and reduce waste.

Performance Standard
2.1 The number of District farmers who receive loans of flow-meters to assist in evaluating their irrigation systems.
.

Goal 3.0 Addressing natural resource issues that impact the use and availability of groundwater and are impacted by the use of groundwater

Management Objective                                                                                             

 3.1 The District will identify at least twenty (20) wells to be used as water quality monitoring wells that will be sampled annually.

Performance Standard                                                                                              

3.1 Number of monitor wells sampled annually for water quality.


Goal 4.0 Addressing conjunctive surface water management issues.

Management Objective                                                                                        

4.1 Meet at least once annually with City of Brady to discuss and review potential use of surface water resources in the area. 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         Performance Standard
4.1 Number of meetings with City representatives annually
.

Management Objective

4.2 Meet at least once annually with Lower Colorado River Authority staff member  to review potential conjunctive groundwater/surface water resources in the area. 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                          Performance Standard
4.2 Number of meetings with LCRA staff annually
.

Goal 5.0 Addressing Drought Conditions

Management Objective                                                                                        

5.1a Annually monitor the Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI), notifying all District public water suppliers of severe drought conditions when they occur.   

5.1b  Notify area residents, in the District newsletter, of severe drought conditions when they occur.

 

Performance Standards                                                                                   

5.1a  Report the current drought status of the District to the Board of Directors at quarterly meetings.           

5. 1b Annually report to the Board of Directors the number of times area residents are notified of severe drought conditions  in the District newsletter  and the number of times that letters are sent to public water suppliers warning of severe drought conditions.  

Goal 6.0a) Addressing Conservation

Management Objectives                                                                                       

6.a)1. At least once annually the District will provide educational literature promoting water conservation in a public educational presentation.

Performance Standard

 6.a)1. Report to Board of Directors annually number of times water conservation information was distributed to area residents or in public informational or educational meetings.

Goal 6.0 (b) Addressing rainwater harvesting

Management Objective      

 6.b)1 The District will display rainwater harvesting manuals publicly at the district office and at least once annually provide notice in the District newsletter that  manuals on rainwater harvesting is available to residents in the District office.

Performance Standards                                                                                       

6.b)1 Report to the Board of Directors annually on the number  of times notice was published in the District newsletter about the availability of Rainwater Harvesting manuals in the District office.

Management Objective                                                                                          

6.b)2  Include information on rainwater harvesting in one public education presentation annually

Performance Standards                                                                                    

 6.b)2 Report to Board of Directors annually the number of educational presentations that included rainwater harvesting information.

Goal 6.0 (c) Addressing brush control

Management Objective                                                                                      

6.c)1  Meet once annually with NRCS to discuss prioritizing brush control for EQIP funds or other federal conservation funding.

Performance Standards                                                                                    

6.c)1  Report to Board of Directors annually on the number of meetings held with NRCS officials regarding priority conservation funding for brush control.

36.1071 (a) Management Goals Not Applicable to the District

Goal 1.0 Controlling and Preventing Subsidence
The rigid geologic framework of the region precludes significant subsidence from occurring. This goal is not applicable to the operation of the District.

Goal 2.0 Addressing recharge enhancement
The Texas Water Development Board, at the request of the District, completed a study of an area within the District to evaluate the possibility of beneficial artificial recharge of this area of the Hickory Aquifer. Evaluation of the Hickory Aquifer and Its Relationship to Katemcy Creek and Its Major Tributaries for Beneficial Recharge, McCulloch and Mason Counties, Texas, is available in the District Office. This study, along with subsequent studies, does not support an economically feasible recharge program.(top)

Goal 3.0 Addressing precipitation enhancement

The District has investigated participation in the West Texas Weather Modification program which performs cloud-seeding operations out of San Angelo, Texas, but had determined that it is not economically feasible.

Goal 4.0 Addressing in a quantifiable manner the Desired Future Conditions of the district aquifers.

The District is actively participating in the joint planning process in Groundwater Management Area 7 pursuant to Section 36.108 of the Texas Water Code. However, the GMA 7 Districts have not yet adopted Desired Future Conditions, which are not due for submission to the Texas Water Development Board until 2010. 

Statement of Commitment by Hickory Underground Water Conservation District      No. 1, to Effectuation of the District Groundwater Management Plan.

The District will implement the provisions of this plan and/or future amendments and will utilize the provisions of this plan, or amended plan, as guidance for implementation of District goals, in promulgating District Rules and  selecting, evaluating, and carrying our district programs, activities and hydrogeologic studies.

 

Bibliography

1 Texas Almanac 2002-2003, 2000 Census Data, The Dallas Morning News
2 “Hickory Water Data” prepared for Hickory UWCD No. 1 by Harden and Associates, August 1986, and aquifer maps obtained from Water for Texas, 1997, TWDB
3 Edwards-Trinity Aquifer information obtained from TWDB website: http://www.twdb.state.tx.us/publications/reports/GroundWaterReports/GWReports/Brackish%20GW%20Manual/08-Edwards-Trinity(Plateau).pdf Report by LBG-Guyton Associates
4 Aquifer maps obtained from Water for Texas, 1997, TWDB
5 Ellenburger-San Saba Aquifer information obtained from TWDB website:     http://www.twdb.state.tx.us/publications/reports/GroundWaterReports/GWReports/Brackish%20GW%20Manual/26-Ellenburger-SanSaba.pdf Report by LBG-Guyton Associates
6 Marble Falls Aquifer information obtained from TWDB website: http://www.twdb.state.tx.us/publications/reports/GroundWaterReports/GWReports/Brackish%20GW%20Manual/27-MarbleFalls.pdf Report by LBG-Guyton Associate

7 Table 3.1-1, Region F Regional Water Plan, TWDB,  January 2006

8 Table 3.2-2 Region F Regional Water Plan, January 2006